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Displacement. These classes represent the two ways in which energy is added to the fluid. Figure 10.1 Pump Configurations 10.1.1 Centrifugal Pump Centrifugal pumps consist of a set of rotating vanes, enclosed within a housing or casing, used to impart energy to a fluid through centrifugal force. The centrifugal pump has two main parts: a rotating element which includes an impeller and a shaft, and a stationary element made up of a volute casing, stuffing box, and bearings. With centrifugal pumps, the energy is added continuously by increasing the fluid velocity with a rotating impeller while reducing the flow area. This arrangement causes an increase in pressure along with the corresponding movement of the fluid. The impeller produces liquid velocity and the volute forces the liquid to discharge from the pump converting velocity to pressure. The stuffing box protects the pump from leakage at the point where the shaft passes out through the pump casing. Centrifugal pumps can be further classified as to one of the following three designs: . Axial Flow - In an axial flow pump, pressure is developed by the propelling or lifting action of the impeller vanes on the liquid. Axial flow pumps are sometimes referred to as propeller pumps. Pumps 10-10 Revision C

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