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CHAPTER SLIDER CRANK MECHANISMS 18.0 TABLE OF CONTENTS 18.1 INTRODUCTION 1 18.2 FAILURE MODES OF SLIDER CRANK MECHANISMS 1 18.3 MODEL DEVELOPMENT 3 18.3.1 Bearings 4 18.3.3 Seals/Gaskets 9 18.3.4 Rings, Dynamic Seals 9 18.3.5 Slider Mechanism 10 18.4 REFERENCES 10 18.1 INTRODUCTION The slider crank mechanism is usually not thought of as an independent mechanical component but rather as an integral part of a more complex piece of equipment such as the piston rod and related components of an internal combustion engine. Figure 18.1 shows a typical slider crank mechanism. The normal function of this particular device is the conversion of rotational force into a linear force or vice versa. The typical slider crank mechanism includes bearings, rods, linkages, seals and a sliding surface such as a cylinder wall. Wear of these parts becomes the primary failure mechanism, the failure modes and effects being dependent upon the application. The geometry of the design plays an important part of the reliability analysis since the mechanical advantage and the wear pattern are greatly influenced by the positioning of parts. 18.2 FAILURE MODES OF SLIDER CRANK MECHANISMS The more predominant failure modes of a slider crank mechanism can be readily identified with frictional action on like or dissimilar materials. The component parts of a slider crank mechanism are subject to wear in varying degrees and the normal approach to reliability analysis is to establish the expected life of the individual parts in the projected operating environment. 18 Slider Crank Mechanisms 18-1 Revision A

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