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CHAPTER BELT AND CHAIN DRIVES 21.0 TABLE OF CONTENTS 21.1 INTRODUCTION 1 21.2 BELT DRIVES 2 21.3 FAILURE MODES OF BELT DRIVES 5 21.4 RELIABILITY PREDICTION OF BELT DRIVES 6 21.4.1 Belt Misalignment 6 21.4.2 Belt Speed 7 21.4.3 Belt Loading 7 21.4.4 Belt Rating 10 21.4.5 Belt Operating Temperature 11 21.5 FAILURE RATE MODEL FOR BELT DRIVE 11 21.6 CHAIN DRIVES 16 21.7 FAILURE MODES OF CHAIN DRIVES 17 21.8 RELIABILITY PREDICTION OF CHAIN DRIVES 20 21.9 FAILURE RATE MODEL FOR CHAIN DRIVE 22 21.10 REFERENCES 29 21.1 INTRODUCTION There are a number of means to mechanically change speeds and transmit power in industrial applications. V-belts, synchronous belts, and chains are three methods of transmitting power between two shafts separated by a wide distance, and they are used over a wide range of speed ratios. V-belt drives are a common means of transmitting horsepower and reducing speed. They are quiet and require very little maintenance. These drives transmit power through friction created by a wedging action of the belt in the sheave groove. V-belts work optimally with speed ratios of up to 6:1, but are available with drive ratios up to 10:1. Synchronous belt drives offer positive engagement between mating teeth of a toothed belt and a toothed sprocket. No lubrication is required and they can operate at higher speeds than other positive engaging drives such as chain drives. Additionally, they offer less noise at slow speeds than chain drives. 21 Belt arid Chain Drives 21 -1 Revision B

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